Cash for Keys

If you lose your home to Foreclosure . . .

If you cannot afford to pay for your home, if you cannot eventually get a loan modification, if a Chapter 13 just won’t work for you, then you will lose your home.  Even if you do a chapter 7 and avoid a foreclosure for a little while, if none of those other options will eventually work for you, then you will lose your home.

Keep in mind that a fantastic option is available but only if you start early enough.  Short Sale can help you immensely by avoiding a foreclosure which means a much smaller hit on your credit than a foreclosure.  Your realtor who is probably a relative or close friend will get a commission, the bank will get paid better than it would have if you’d gotten foreclosed and it’s a win win win situation.  If your Realtor is a close relative or family friend, then think of what it means to keep the business in the family.  Because if you’re going to lose the property anyway, why wouldn’t you help your siblings and friends pay their bills too.

At that point, once the home has foreclosed and/or been repossessed by the bank, within a few days, usually only 2 or 3, a Realtor working for the bank will show up and ask you to move.  When they do, they’ll often offer you some moving money.  Usually it’s about $3000.  I believe there’s an Obama stimulus plan which reimburses the bank up to $3000.  A client of mine told me that his offer went like this: $3000 if they were out in 2 weeks, $2000 if out in 3 weeks and No thousand dollars if longer than 3 weeks. Behind the money is the hope on the part of the bank that if you expect to get paid, you’ll have to leave the property in a livable condition, not scrubbed but clean, carpets not shampooed but the house broomed out.  Above all, they want the sinks, faucets, toilets and carpets to still be in the place once you’re gone.

Most of you in this situation have probably already started looking and maybe even found a place to go.  I recommend you keep enough furniture in the house to make it look like you still live there, if you have moved, they won’t offer you anything.

Broom cleaning is usually all that’s required and sometimes they’ll ask you to leave the major appliances behind.  If they are yours and you cannot afford to replace them, let the realtor know that you have take them with you.  Usually you can work something out and these are much less critical than are the sinks, faucets, doors, door knobs, carpets and toilets.

The agreement between you and the real estate agent for the bank will state that you must have the place empty on the last day, and that the real estate agent will inspect the property before turning over the check.  If you haven’t cleaned all the trash out of the garage, you’re not getting the check.  If you have packed up the sinks, faucets, carpet and toilets, you might as well not both showing up to ask for the check.  Besides you don’t want to walk out with fixtures because there’s a good chance the bank will sue you.

Your Landlord has a Foreclosure

If your landlord has a foreclosure on the property that you’re living in, you have a unique situation.  Now the bank must be really nice to you.  The law requires that they give you the cash for keys and that they give you more time to move.

My personal favorite part is this: the landlord can no longer do an inspection and determine how much of your deposit he has to pay you back.  If you are paid current on the rents, he still must send you a settlement letter within 3 weeks and pay back your deposit.  However, you and I both know he doesn’t have it.  If he doesn’t send the settlement letter and payment on time, you can sue him for 3 times the balance due to you.  If your deposit with $1500 you sue him for $4500 in small claims.

If he files a bankruptcy on it, and tries to say that the deposit is discharged in bankruptcy, you tell him that it was money held in trust and therefore not dischargeable.  You will want a bankruptcy attorney who does creditor’s work to help you and you will have to do it during the bankruptcy or you may lose your rights.

Chapter 13 2nd Mortgage Lien Stripping

Chapter 13 2nd Mortgage Lien Stripping

You may be able to strip your 2nd mortgage or home equity line of credit, Heloc, off of your home in a Chapter 13.  Not only can you discharge the loan, or promissory note that you signed when you executed the loan docs, but you may also be able to remove the lien from your home as well.  If the Bankruptcy Judge assigned to your case agrees, then once your chapter 13 case is over, the creditor must release the lien.

You may also be able to remove the 2nd mortgage from a rental property and in addition, you may also be able to reduce the 1st mortgage as well.  Rental property properties have different rules than residences do.  An important distinction, you must remember that if you live in the house, you have fewer options than if you have moved out and rented the place.

IT WORKS PRETTY MUCH LIKE THIS:

A 2nd mortgage, or home equity line of credit, has two things over you:

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a) the have the note that you signed promising to pay
b) they have a deed of trust or trust deed on the house which is a lien on the house
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Chapter 7 Bankruptcy discharges the Note or the Loan, but you still have the Lien or Trust Deed on your house.  Even after your bankruptcy, your 2nd mortgage lender can foreclose the lien, but in order to do so, it must first pay off the 1st mortgage and any unpaid property taxes.

This is a big difference between the two chapters of  Consumer Bankruptcy.  After a chapter 7 is over and completed, the 2nd mortgage could still foreclose on the house later.  Over time, the value of the property will go up. The house will appreciate.  After it’s value increases to a point where the value of the house is greater than the balance on the first mortgage, the 2nd mortgage would be in a position to foreclose the property.

So, what you do is:

1.  Get an appraisal.  We must be able to credibly state that the value of the home is significantly lower than the balance on the 1st mortgage.   If your value is lower but close, you run the risk of expensive litigation in order to strip your 2nd mortgage or home equity line of credit.  Of course, if the balance on the 2nd is large compared to the cost of the litigation, then it’s worth the effort.  As long as you know that the attorney’s fees could be significant as you’re going into the deal, then it’s fine if you want to spend the money.  Nevertheless, those attorney’s fees would be on a three to five year payment plan so it should be manageable.

2.  If the value of the home is lower than the balance on the first and it is significantly lower, then the mortgage lender on the 2nd mortgage or Heloc, Home Equity Line of Credit, won’t fight it, and you’ll win by default.

3.  If the value of the home is greater than the balance on the first, even just a little bit, then you lose and you’re stuck with the whole 2nd mortgage.   Remember however, there is a difference between your primary residence and your rental properties.  Respecting your primary residence, you can only remove your 2nd mortgage, or not.  Rental properties however, can have 2nd mortgages removed, 1st mortgages reduced, or if the value of the home is above the balance on the 1st mortgage, the 2nd mortgage (or heloc) could be reduced so that the total balances on all mortgages are equal to the value of the property.

Caution

Chapter 7s are risky. We don’t know how long it will take the values of our real estate to increase.  If you do a chapter 7, you will discharge the loan, or promissory note.  Nevertheless, you will still have the deed of trust still attached to the house.  So at some point you must settle that 2nd mortgage with that bank.

Chapter 13s are risky too.  They can allow you to strip the 2nd mortgage off the house completely.  Risky because chapter 13 (on your primary residence) requires that you immediately go back to paying your regularly scheduled monthly mortgage payments on your 1st.  If the 1st mortgage has not yet been modified on the date of filing the bankruptcy, then you’d be stuck with the unmodified mortgage payments.

All chapter 13s must be approved by the judge assigned to your case.  Called a confirmation order, many cases end up falling short because people who want to remove the 2nd mortgage often propose payment plans that are unrealistic.  In other words the budgets they propose for themselves are just too tight.  Your attorney will refer to such a budget as unfeasible.  Feasibility just means that you really can afford to make the monthly payment to the bankruptcy trustee on your case.  To be confirmed, a case must be feasible, and you must convince your judge and your bankruptcy trustee that you can afford to to make the chapter 13 plan payments.

Additionally, most chapter 13s never get completed once they are confirmed.  More than 70% don’t get a chapter 13 discharge because something happens that derails the payment plan such as a work stoppage or an illness, or even just a busted transmission.  Either your earning capacity has been reduced or your ability to pay has been eclipsed by a more pressing expense.

Stripping the 2nd mortgage off in a chapter 13 requires that you complete the payment plan.  If your hypothetical plan payment is $350/mo and you pay it for 2 1/2 years that’s a total of $350 x 30 months = $10,500.  What if you cannot pay it anymore because of a work stoppage, you get fired or laid off, you break your leg, your transmission goes bad? You’re not going to complete your chapter 13 payment plan.  Guess what, you just tossed $10,500 out the window.

So, to strip a 2nd mortgage off of your primary residence,

  1. the value of the property must be lower than the balance on your first mortgage
  2. you must be able to pay the 1st mortgage payment,
  3. you must get the judge to agree that you are able to afford the plan payment,
  4. and you must complete the plan which will be 3 to 5 years long.

How Much Will My Chapter 13 Plan Payment Be?

Plan payments depend on a couple things

  1. how much excess income you have at the end of the month
  2. how much the means test says you must pay
  3. how much you owe on unpaid mortgage payments from previously unpaid months called arrears
  4. back taxes and child support
  5. the balance owing on your car
  6. how much of your attorney’s fees were paid in advance
  7. how much you usually get as tax refunds
  8. and several other possible issues

You will have to call for a consultation on the issue in order to get an estimate.

Call 800 FILE AWAY or 800 345 3292, call right now for a consultation.

David L Nelson
Temecula Bankruptcy Attorney
Temecula bankruptcy attorney, Murrieta bankruptcy attorney, Lake Elsinore bankruptcy attorney, Canyon Lake bankruptcy attorney, Menifee bankruptcy attorney, Perris bankruptcy attorney, Riverside bankruptcy attorney, Corona bankruptcy attorney, San Diego bankruptcy attorney, Los Angeles bankruptcy attorney, LA, and Orange County bankruptcy attorney

Debt Freedom and Retirement

Debt Freedom is Required for Retirement

If you’re like most of us, you’re planning to retire on your 401k or other similar Retirement plan. And you’re wondering if Walmart and McDonalds will have too many “senior” team members when you get there.  Because you’re going end up with a lower income than the one that you presently cannot live on, you wonder what will you do then?  Do you really think social security will be available?  Even if it is, how much buying power will it have?  My mom used to get the equivalent of groceries and utilities, and that was it.

I will teach you how a 2nd Mortgage can be treated as though Stripped Off your home even in a Chapter 7, and how you can in fact strip a 2nd Mortgage off your home with a Chapter 13.

Because your retirement income will most likely be lower, than your current income: If you’re still in debt at retirement time, you’re going to file Bankruptcy.  Why not file right now?  Put those credit card payments into your retirement accounts instead.  I realize that for most of you, if you didn’t have to pay consumer debts, you would not likely be able to just switch portions of your budget over to retirement planning.  You’re eating white bread from Albertsons with non-fat milk and telling yourself that it’s because the non-fat is healthier.  Just to pay the gas expense, you’re wearing sweaters at night and walking to the not as good park because you can’t afford to drive to the nice one with the lake.  Telling yourself and your kids that walking is good for you even though the slides are broken isn’t making you feel any better. I get it.  However, what if you could have a more normal budget and maybe put at least some into savings?

RETIREMENT AND KEEPING YOUR HOME:

YOU MUST GET OUT OF DEBT. When it comes to Retirement, or Wealth Building, getting out of debt is not the FINAL step but the FIRST. Mortgages must be part of the formula. How can you Retire when you’re in debt?

Here’s what I see everyday: Your Mortgage payment is $1500/mo and your 2nd is $500/mo.  In Credit Cards you have $25,000 with payments of another $500/mo.  Both Mortgages have 30 year terms.  At year 10 you start up a 401k plan and a personal IRA.  But how much can you put into either?  You’ve got $1000 in debt service going out of your budget every month.  Each month before you eat, you have to pay $1000 to cyberspace or “The Man”.

Assuming you have an income of $6500/mo and take home $5300 after taxes and insurances, and that you’re married and you have 2 children living at home.  First, I’d recommend, one of you must get a better job or another job as soon as possible.

$5300 Net Pay Less
$2000 Mortgages
$500 Debts and Credit Cards
$2,800 Left after that. (the rest of the budget must be calculated.)
$700 Two Car Payments
$500 Gas and Travel for the two cars
$100 Car Insurance
$40 Medical Expenses out of pocket
$800 Groceries (and everything that comes from the store) and Fast Food on the way to and from work, school and at work and school.
$400 Day Care
$400 All Utilities including Internet $30, Cell Phones $150, Home Heating & Cooking $100,  TV $50, Water $70
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You can see that this family’s budget is already negative.  Add clothing & shoes $150 (for four), life insurance $80, hair cuts & beauty shop $40, tithing/charitable giving $40, laundry/dry cleaning $35 and home maintenance $20 and you’re toast.

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Bankrupt already, and you just didn’t know it.

Filing bankruptcy for this family would be a fantastic idea.  Just think about it.  Even if they were stuck with the 2nd mortgage when it was over, how much better off would they be if they could just get out of under the credit cards payments.

In a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy they must Qualify.  Called the Means Test, the qualification test starts with your gross income and asks first are you above it or below it?  If above, then there is an 8 page questionnaire that you must go through to see if you qualify or not, and in my experience, 97% of my clients have qualified by the time we are done with the 8 page questionnaire.  In our current test case, the family makes $6,500/mo which is $78,000/yr.  The Median Income for a family of 4 this year is $78,869.00 and they get to skip the 8 page test.  Part three of the Qualification Test, we go their budget to see if they have any money left over when it is all said and done.  Even adding that $500 from the credit cards back in leaves them negative $5.00/mo so they have qualified for a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.

In Chapter 13 you must also Qualify, but the test is basically this, can you afford to make a payment?  Why would you want to do a Chapter 13?  If the value of the home is lower than the balance on the 1st mortgage, then this family could do a chapter 13 bankruptcy and strip that 2nd mortgage off of the house.  In this case, they would divert the $500/mo that they are paying to their 2nd mortgage, or perhaps even a bit less depending on circumstances, and at the end of three short years, (in this hypothetical case) the 2nd mortgage is gone, the lien is released, and that $500/mo payment is gone forever starting 17 years earlier than planned.

I cannot stress this enough, what happens in month 37?

Okay, probably after a short vacation so probably in Month 40 or 45, they can now put that $500/mo that had been going into the 2nd mortgage into their retirement planning.  If it goes into an IRA, Life Insurance, 401k, or whatever, at least it is now going into their future rather than huge bonuses to Citibank and Chase Mastercard’s CEOs.

I would pay the 1st Mortgage off at this point. 17 years x 12 months is 204 months x $500/mo is $102,000.  Any mortgage with a $1500 payment could probably be paid off before the 17 years is over when you combine the 2nd mortgage payment with the first and pay down the first with $2000/mo instead of only $1500.

If you put the $102,000 into an IRA or a 401k how much would you have at the end of 17 more years, it’s hard to say, it could easily be only the $102,000 or it could be $250,000.  What will the monthly payments be from a pot of $250,000 when you retire?  I’m not a retirement planner but I’m sure it would be less than $1500/mo.

So with a chapter 7 our hypothetical family might have some breathing room.

With a chapter 13 they might be able to pay off their 1st mortgage and save for retirement. HERE’S A CREDIBLE PLAN TO RETIRE EARLY THAT CAN ACTUALLY WORK WITHOUT SELLING STUFF TO YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS.  (Not that there’s anything wrong with that.)

It depends on the value of the house.

DO NOT WAIT, FILE NOW.  YOUR HOME’S VALUE WILL START HEADING BACK UP SOON IF IT HAS NOT ALREADY.  YOU MUST FILE NOW TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS.

Temecula bankruptcy attorney, Murrieta bankruptcy attorney, Lake Elsinore bankruptcy attorney, Canyon Lake bankruptcy attorney, Menifee bankruptcy attorney, Perris bankruptcy attorney, Riverside bankruptcy attorney, Corona bankruptcy attorney, San Diego bankruptcy attorney, Los Angeles bankruptcy attorney, LA, and Orange County bankruptcy attorney

Chapter 7 and Your 2nd Mortgage

Updated on June 13th, 2018.

Refinancing Your Second Mortgage

Yes, it may be an actual option. And as unlikely as it may seem or feel, if you have home equity now (at this writing in 2018) then a refinance may work but only if you have good enough credit. But how do you manage that after having filed a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy? Believe it or not, credit repair services use the same techniques outlined in the following Guide. The Attorney’s Guide to Credit Repair. It’s Fast, Easy and Guaranteed.

In fact many use the very same Guide. Follow this guide to repair your credit fast, including how to write letters to settle debts such as your 2nd Mortgage. Download it Now and Get Started Right Away with The Attorney’s Guide to Credit Repair. It’s Fast, Easy and Guaranteed.

Your 2nd Mortgage or Home Equity Line of Credit – Heloc

While it is true that you may be able to strip these off of your home in a Chapter 13, in a Chapter 7 you can’t, but, you may still be able to effectively ignore it (for a while) and keep your home.  However, the 2nd Mortgage or Heloc would still have a lien on the property.  You would then have to settle the lien or deal with it in some manner later on. Your 2nd or Heloc has two things over you

a) they have the promissory note that you signed promising to pay

b) they have a deed of trust or trust deed on the house which is a lien on the house also called a mortgage. 

If you have filed a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, then the Chapter 7 discharges the Loan or Promissory Note, which means that the mortgage company or lending bank cannot collect money from you directly. They cannot sue you, garnish your wages, levy your bank account, or even ask you for money or anything like that.

If you still own the home, then you still have that 2nd Mortgage Lien called a Trust Deed or Mortgage on your property. Chapter 7 Bankruptcy does not remove that kind of lien from your house, not in the 9th Circuit Appeals Court’s jurisdiction. Therefore, if the value of the house is high enough, then your 2nd mortgage lender can foreclose that lien, but in order to do so, it must pay off the 1st mortgage and any unpaid property taxes first.

Some Things You Can Try Include, But Are Not Limited To: 

1.  Refinance Your Second Mortgage: Yes, it may be an actual option. But if you have bad credit, you will have to repair it first.

2.  If the Value of the house is higher than the balance on your 1st mortgage then you must deal with your 2nd mortgage now.  If it is lower than the balance on your first, then you don’t have to deal with them immediately, but you must deal with them eventually, because, remember, they have a lien on the house.

3.  If the value is relatively close to the balance on 1st mortgage then you will have to deal with the 2nd mortgage sooner rather than later because in not too much time, the value of the house will go up high enough for the 2nd mortgage company to be able to foreclose. If you cannot afford to settle it, you should consider trying a loan modification. 

4.  What most clients will do is make an offer to settle the 2nd mortgage lien in one payment, one time with no balance owing afterwards, and you must get that in writing from the bank before you mail your cashier’s check. You might have to take a massive 401k loan in order to be able to make such an offer, but if they take it, it would be worth it. 

5.  If you have previously filed a bankruptcy and then the 2nd mortgage lender cancels the debt and sends a 1099 for the “forgiven” balance next year, then you are able to deduct the amount because it was already previously “forgiven” or when you filed your chapter 7 bankruptcy and received your chapter 7 bankruptcy discharged. 

6.  Most clients will save as much as possible and then when they get a tax refund next year, they add that with the savings, and if possible, sell a car or some jewelry and then use that to make an offer to settle the lien. (Dear Reader, when I originally wrote this several years ago, most homes had much lower values and so it was so much easier to offer to settle such a second mortgage. However because home values have gone up considerably, it’s nearly impossible to do now.) 

7.  In any case, your Discharge Order from your Chapter 7 Bankruptcy prohibits  all kinds of collections.  Therefore, they cannot hound you, dunn you, or bother you, whether by phone, email or letters demanding payment of the loan or promissory note.  They have only one legal option, they can foreclose. It doesn’t mean that they won’t but knowing your rights, that they cannot, at least you can protect yourself.  REMEMBER however, that the 2nd Mortgage must pay off the 1st Mortgage in order to foreclose.

8.  If your home has significant value which it probably does, the loan modifications are an option to protect your home, and if necessary, selling your home as a method of preserving the home equity is also a great option. Not that those are the best options, but they are options. Additionally, Chapter 13 Bankruptcy may be a viable option as well.

THEREFORE, the probability of them foreclosing is lower and lower when the value of the house is lower than the balance on the 1st mortgage.  It’s simple math, they won’t pay off a $200K loan to get a $150K asset that they can then resell and only recoup $150K and they’d have to pay closing costs to sell it so they’d only net $120K. That would be a loss of $80K plus they would also lose all of the 2nd mortgage too which is probably another $50K or more on top of the $80K.

HOWEVER, when the 1st and 2nd are held by the same company and particularly if that company is a credit union, it may be possible that they’d foreclose anyway but if the payment on the 1st is getting paid, then it’s still not very likely.

Overall, when dealing with a 2nd mortgage, it’s risky, no matter what happens. A chapter 13 which would allow stripping off the 2nd mortgage, is risky too.  Even more so because your Chapter 13 Bankruptcy requires that you immediately go back to paying your regularly scheduled monthly mortgage payments on your 1st mortgage, and if the 1st was not yet modified on the date of filing the bankruptcy, then you’d be stuck with the unmodified mortgage payments. Also, most Chapter 13 Bankruptcies never get completed.  More than 70% don’t get a chapter 13 discharge because something happens that derails the payment plan such as a work stoppage or an illness, or even something unexpected such as a busted transmission. Stripping the 2nd mortgage off in a chapter 13 requires that you complete the three to five year payment plan, so it’s majorly risky because if you have a hypothetical plan payment of $350/mo and you pay it for 2 1/2 years and then if you cannot pay anymore and you don’t get your plan completed, guess what, you just tossed $350 x 30 months out the window.  That’s $10,500 that you’ll never get back, and that’s only if you get a payment that low to begin with.  Most are higher.

In Summary:

Offer to Settle Your 2nd Mortgage

So, in summary, making an offer to settle the balance on the 2nd after a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, should aim to pay (I originally wrote 10% of the balance or less, but nowadays the percentage at this writing in 2018, must be much higher). However if the house is seriously upside down on the 1st mortgage already, you may be able to offer lower. But it does have to be paid in one payment once they accept and you must get them to accept it in advance in writing. You must not pay them unless you have it from them in writing that they will accept your settlement offer and that they will RELEASE the lien once they get the payment.

I’ll say it again just in case you didn’t hear me, they must agree to RELEASE the lien in writing once they get your payment. If they don’t agree to release the lien, don’t send the check.

Refinancing Your Second Mortgage

1.  Refinance Your Second Mortgage: Yes, it may be an actual option. And as unlikely as it may seem or feel, if you have home equity now (at this writing in 2018) then a refinance may work but only if you have good enough credit. But how do you manage that after having filed a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy? Believe it or not, credit repair services use the same techniques outlined in the following Guide. The Attorney’s Guide to Credit Repair. It’s Fast, Easy and Guaranteed.

In fact many use the very same Guide. Follow this guide to repair your credit fast, including how to write letters to settle debts such as your 2nd Mortgage. Download it Now and Get Started Right Away with The Attorney’s Guide to Credit Repair. It’s Fast, Easy and Guaranteed.

YOUR HOA MAY SUE YOU EVEN AFTER YOUR BANKRUPTCY

YOUR HOA MAY SUE YOU EVEN AFTER YOUR BANKRUPTCY:

THE BANKRUPTCY CODE SPECIFICALLY ALLOWS IT!  The Rule is that you can eliminate your personal liability to pay your Home Owner’s Association up to the date that you file your case.  But what happens AFTER?

YOUR HOME OWNER’S ASSOCIATION CAN SUE YOU IF:

FILING BANKRUPTCY STOPS FORECLOSURE, BUT YOU MUST STILL EITHER WORK OUT A LOAN MODIFICATION OR SETUP A CHAPTER 13 PAYMENT PLAN IN ORDER TO STRIP OFF THE 2ND AND CATCH UP YOUR FIRST. IF ALL GOES WELL YOU WON’T THINK ABOUT YOUR HOA, YOU JUST CONTINUE TO PAY IT.

IF THE ABOVE DOESN’T WORK OUT, YOUR AIM MUST BE FOR A SHORT SALE to avoid a Foreclosure after Bankruptcy.  Doing a Short Sale will take the Home Owner’s Association into account as part of the final deal and that will be that.

But if you end up with a Foreclosure after Bankruptcy . . .

FORECLOSURE AFTER BANKRUPTCY:

If you know that you can’t pay a Chapter 13 payment (YOU MUST CONSULT A BANKRUPTCY ATTORNEY TO BE SURE, NEVER ASSUME ONE WAY OR THE OTHER WITHOUT A CONSULTATION FIRST), & if you cannot pay your 1st, you are going to lose your property.  So, File a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy: Your 2nd or HELOC will no longer be able to sue once your Chapter 7 has discharged.  You can stay in the property a bit longer while saving up to move. You could get a couple or even several extra months Rent-Free! But if you don’t do a short sale, you will eventually have a foreclosure.

Your HOA will be able to sue you from the date that you filed your Bankruptcy until the day your property is foreclosed.  I have seen this more than once, a couple assumes that a short sale is on track, and then it doesn’t go through.  Meanwhile they have not been paying the Home Owner’s Association fees.  Probably they haven’t paid for a year prior to filing the bankruptcy so they are out of the habit of paying it.  Once the bankruptcy took place, they still didn’t pay because they couldn’t afford to, or they assumed that the short sale would take care of it.

But if you don’t pay, and there’s a foreclosure, you’re going to owe all HOA fees and assessments from the day that you filed until the day that you no longer owned the property. Because they banks don’t want to pay the HOA fees either, I have seen them take a couple years to actually repossess a house, especially if the family has already moved out.  $150/mo in HOA fees plus special assessments, attorney’s fees and costs adds up pretty quickly.

SO CONTINUE TO PAY THE HOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION FEES UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD OR FORECLOSED.  If you don’t want to pay the HOA Fees to the HOA because you expect a short sale to take care of it, put the HOA Fees into a savings account just in case the short sale doesn’t go through.  If it doesn’t go through you just pay them.  If it does go through, you have a small savings account to use as moving money, or maybe replacing your appliances.

Bankruptcy Attorney David Nelson

Temecula bankruptcy attorney, Murrieta bankruptcy attorney, Lake Elsinore bankruptcy attorney, Canyon Lake bankruptcy attorney, Menifee bankruptcy attorney, Perris bankruptcy attorney, Riverside bankruptcy attorney, Corona bankruptcy attorney, San Diego bankruptcy attorney, Los Angeles bankruptcy attorney, LA, and Orange County bankruptcy attorney